News for care providers

Keep up to date with all the latest news for providers of care and support for adults.

Claims can now be submitted for this year's Workforce Development Funding (WDF)

Workforce Development Funding (WDF) is a funding stream from the Department of Health, disbursed by Skills for Care, which care providers in Norfolk are able to claim through Norfolk and Suffolk Care Support. The funding contributes towards training costs related to QCF and RQF qualifications in adult social care.

There have been some important changes for 2018/19 following the change from QCF to RQF qualifications.

Not all social care RCF qualifications will necessarily be funded by WDF. Please check to see which qualifications are eligible.

There is no longer a 60 credit limit per learner. There is now a financial limit of £1,200 per learner per year.

This is the last funding year that QCF qualifications will be funded. So please ensure you have completed certificates with us by 31st March 2019.

You can ONLY use a certificate as evidence for claiming. The Unit Assessment Summaries will no longer be accepted as evidence. All the guidance and forms needed have been uploaded to the N&SCS website.

 If you have any questions about claiming please call the N&SCS office on 01603 629211 and chat to a member of the team. We are very happy to talk you through the process.

A new law is being introduced by the government to simplify the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLs) system.

The government said the new system will ease the burden on local authorities, saving an estimated £200m a year, which will go towards frontline care and address the current backlog of 108,000 people whose safeguards have not been reviewed.

The Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill is designed to ensure the system is less burdensome on people, carers, families and local authorities.  It aims to introduce a simpler process with more engagement with families and swifter access to justice.

It also allows the NHS, rather than local authorities, to authorise patients and enable a more streamlined and clearly accountable process, while considering restriction of people’s liberties holistically as part of their overall care package.

The bill also aims to eliminate repeat assessment and authorisations when someone moves between a care home, hospital and ambulance as part of their treatment.

Minister for Care Caroline Dinenage said:  "Treating people with respect and dignity, no matter their disability or condition, is the touchstone of a civilised society.

"I want to ensure that the system works for everyone and ensures that individuals’ fundamental rights are protected while reassuring families their loved ones are getting good care.

"We know local authorities are under pressure which is why these reforms are so important: to reduce the burden on councils so they can focus their resources where they are needed on the frontline."

Law Commissioner Nicholas Paines QC said:  "In our report we were clear that the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards needed to be replaced as a matter of pressing urgency.

"This new legislation, based broadly on our recommendations, will go a long way towards addressing the flaws of the current system and better protect the most vulnerable in our society."

Public Health England have released new information relating to the preventing of type 2 diabetes.

There is a dedicated web page which provides information on the background and scale of type 2 diabetes, national response, lifestyle interventions and a call to action page.  

A summary of 11 actions which local authorities and homecare providers can consider to create more stable homecare markets and reduce the possibility of local market failure has been published.

'Top Tips for Sustaining Homecare' is a joint publication, agreed between the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS), the Local Government Association (LGA) and United Kingdom Homecare Association (UKHCA).

Workforce Development Funding (WDF) is a funding stream from the Department of Health, disbursed by Skills for Care, which care providers in Norfolk are able to claim through Norfolk and Suffolk Care Support.  The funding contributes towards training costs related to QCF and RQF qualifications in adult social care.

There have been some important changes for 2018/19 following the change from QCF to RQF qualifications.

Not all social care RCF qualifications will necessarily be funded by WDF.  Please check to see which qualifications are eligible.

There is no longer a 60 credit limit per learner.  There is now a financial limit of £1,200 per learner per year.

This is the last funding year that QCF qualifications will be funded.  Please ensure you have completed certificates with us by 31 March 2019.

You can only use a certificate as evidence for claiming.  The Unit Assessment Summaries will no longer be accepted as evidence.

Download the guidance and forms from the N&SCS website.

If you have any questions about claiming please call the N&SCS office on 01603 629211 and chat to a member of the team, who will be happy to talk you through the process.

‘Driving improvement’ is a collection of case studies that tell the stories of nine services that received an inadequate rating and/or enforcement action but were able to make improvements and achieve a rating of good.  The case studies explore how the services reacted to the initial rating, what they did to turn things around, and what they learnt through the process.

CQC interviewed nine adult social care services that had achieved a significant improvement on their rating.  They spoke to a range of people at each service.  This included people who use services and their families, registered managers, providers and owners, care staff, administrative and other staff, commissioners and social workers.

The experiences of the services show that improvement in adult social care is possible.  The nine case studies highlight some clear actions that other providers can use to help them learn and improve.

Reaction to the initial inspection report

Most providers react to a report highlighting failures with shock, surprise and disappointment.  But usually when people stand back and have time to reflect, they understand the failings.

For some staff the report can come as a relief, as they may have been struggling – doing their very best but unable to deliver the care they wanted to.

For some, the report was a wake-up call; providers who allowed standards to slip, perhaps due to a range of pressures.

Leadership

The value of a good leader cannot be underestimated. In most of the providers CQC spoke to, a new manager had come into the service to deliver the improvements.  They engage with staff, people who use services and their families and are open to suggestions but set parameters and take tough decisions where necessary.

Cultural change

Failing organisations tend to have cultures in which staff are afraid to speak out, don’t feel they have a voice and are not listened to.  Involving staff is one of the best ways to drive improvement.

Person-centred care

Typically, when a new manager took up the reins, they wanted to see care plans.  In most cases these were lacking in detail and did not show that the care being provided was person-centred.  It is not possible to provide good care if the care staff do not understand the needs of the person being cared for.

Working with partners

Most of the services featured received support to help them improve – mainly from the corporate provider, if there was one, or commissioning bodies.

Download the report

Skills for Care have launched a new guide which aims to provide managers with a starting point to consider the best ways to develop their workforce and sustain learning.

The new interactive guide highlights the importance and benefits of learning and development opportunities and how to identify the needs of your services.  It introduces you to apprenticeships and qualifications, other learning opportunities and how to find out what is best suited to your business needs and those of your workforce.

Developed with managers in mind, it aims to answer some of the questions you might have and provides a starting point in how to develop an effective and efficient learning and development strategy for your organisation.

It’s full of hints and tips on how to choose the right approach and full of practical guidance in the delivery and assessment of learning and development opportunities.  It provides information on the cost of training and measuring its success along with providing information and ideas on how to keep your workforce up to date.

This new guide replaces both the previous guides: Ongoing Learning & Development in Adult Social Care, and Choosing Workforce Learning.

This session will aim to provide a basic awareness of some elements of epilepsy and diabetes.

The categories which will be covered for epilepsy are: Living with Epilepsy, Seizures and First Aid.  For diabetes, the areas which will be covered are: Living with Diabetes, Understanding Hypos and Preventing Foot Problems.

The training is being offered by Anglian Training and Duet Diabetes.  The training will take place across Norfolk and Suffolk.

The training date for Norfolk is 17 September 2018, 9am start at West Costessey Hall, Norwich, NR5 0RW.

If you would like more information about the training, please email either info@angliantraining.co.uk or info@duetdiabetes.co.uk or visit the Duet Diabetes website.

The county-wide Care Homes project has compiled a clinical guide for Primary and Community care clinicians to enable them to support their Care Homes population effectively.  The guide provides a wide range of information ranging from UTIs and nutrition to Palliative care protocol and much more. The guide can be accessed via the Knowledge Anglia website.

Independent Age have recently published a new advice booklet called: Home safety – How to spot risks and prevent accidents.  This is likely to be relevant to the people you support and your staff as an information resource.

The booklets are written for older people but the information is useful to people of all ages. They are in an easy read format, making them accessible to different audiences.

With summer approaching and hot weather just around the corner, we thought it would be useful to share some resources with you which focus on keeping older people safe in hot weather.  Although it is common for most people to enjoy the warmer weather, when heat waves strike, enjoyment in the sun can soon become danger in the sun.

The following resources give you tips and suggestions about how you can keep elderly people cooler when it is warm outside.  They also provide facts and statistics as to why it is so important not to ignore heat wave weather warnings, as they can have detrimental effects on older people.

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