Educational Psychologist

What is the role of an educational psychologist?

Educational psychologists (EPs) work mainly with schools and early years settings to help them provide the best possible support to children who have special educational needs (SEN). EPs work directly with individual children or groups of children and also help parents, teachers, and other professionals to understand the child’s difficulties.

EPs carry out assessments then write reports making recommendations for action to be taken by schools and others. They assist with monitoring progress.

EPs can also provide training for teachers and other professionals on issues such as behavioural management, stress management, bullying and general assessment. They can advise schools and local authorities about their policies on children with special educational needs as well as developing and supporting therapeutic and behavioural management programmes.

Who do they work for?

The local authority employs EPs as part of the educational psychology and specialist support service within children’s services. They work in schools and early years settings. Some EPs also work as independent or private consultants and can be employed directly by schools or parents.

Who is this service for?

EPs usually work with children as part of a graduated approach by schools to meeting special educational needs, but are also involved in making assessments for education, health, and care plans. Your child’s school will talk to you if they feel your child would benefit from seeing an EP.

If you are worried that your child has SEN which have not been identified or addressed, you should talk to the SENCO or headteacher at the school first

Contact an EP

You should not need to contact an EP directly. If you are worried that your child has SEN which have not been identified or addressed, you should talk to the class teacher or the school SENCO first.

You can find contact details for all Norfolk schools on our School Finder.

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